An argument against legalization of prohibited drugs in australia

Messenger Some of the greatest harms from using illicit drugs are because they are illegal. Illegal drug production is unregulated and many drugs are manufactured in backyard labs.

An argument against legalization of prohibited drugs in australia

An argument against legalization of prohibited drugs in australia

But what can we do? Some people feel that we should legalise drugs — treat them like alcohol and tobacco, as regulated products. One of the arguments for legalisation is that it would eliminate or at least significantly reduce the illegal black market and criminal networks associated with the drug trade.

Other arguments include moving the problem away from police and the criminal justice system and concentrating responses within health. Governments could accrue taxation revenue from illegal drugs as they currently do from gambling, alcohol and tobacco. The strongest argument against legalisation is that it would result in significant increases in drug use.

We know that currently legal drugs, such as alcohol and tobacco, are widely consumed and associated with an extensive economic burden to society — including hospital admissions, alcoholism treatment programs and public nuisance.

So why create an environment where this may also come to pass for currently illegal drugs? But suppositions can be made about the extent of cost-savings to society. The moral argument against legalisation is that it would send the wrong message. Indeed, some of our research on a regulated legal cannabis market suggests that there may not be the significant savings under a legalisation regime that some commentators have argued.

But these are hypothetical exercises. Decriminalisation An alternative to legalisation is decriminalisation. But, in essence, decriminalisation refers to a reduction of legal penalties. Decriminalisation largely applies to drug use and possession offences, not to the sale or supply of drugs.

Arguments in favour of decriminalisation include its focus on drug users rather than drug suppliers.

If you answered yes to the above question, why do you think this?

The idea is to provide users with a more humane and sensible response to their drug use. Decriminalisation has the potential to reduce the burden on police and the criminal justice system. It also removes the negative consequences including stigma associated with criminal convictions for drug use.

There are also concerns that it may lead to increased drug use but this assumes that current criminal penalties operate as a deterrent for some people. The moral arguments noted above also apply to decriminalisation — lesser penalties may suggest that society approves of drug use. Many countries, including Australia, have decriminalised cannabis use: The moral argument against decriminalisation is that it suggests society approves of drug use.

And research on diverting drug use offenders away from a criminal conviction and into treatment has shown that these individuals are just as likely to succeed in treatment as those who attend voluntarily. Despite the largely supportive evidence base, politicians appear reluctant to proceed along the decriminalisation path.

Some commentators have speculated that this is because of public opinion — decriminalisation is regarded as an unpopular policy choice. But public opinion is largely in support of decriminalisation, where it concerns cannabis though not decriminalisation for other illegal drugs.

The other reason for equivocal policy support, I believe, is a lack of clarity about the issues. Many people equate decriminalisation with legalisation, but as detailed above, they are very different in policy, intent and action.Nov 07,  · The Arguments For and Against Drug Prohibition.

Updated on November 4, Pseudonymous. there remain many new and old drugs which have been prohibited in their place. Despite prohibition, drug use remains high, fuelling an underground market which supports a vast network of organised criminals and petty crooks.

Australia's recreational drug policies aren't working, so what are the options for reform?

The Argument against Reviews: 3. Greens leader Richard Di Natale wants Australia to legalise cannabis for personal use, regulated by a federal agency. This proposal is for legalisation of recreational use for .

Greens wants Australia to legalise cannabis adult use. Arguments for and against legalising cannabis in Australia. According to the proposal, a government agency would licence, monitor and regulate production and sale, and regularly review the regulations.

The pros and cons of prohibiting drugs Don Weatherburn and Research, Australia Abstract In September , a group known as Australia 21 called for a rethink on the prohibition against illegal drugs. If the response from Australian Federal, State, and Territory The term ‘‘partial legalization’’ refers to laws which legalize the.

In Australia, cannabis possession and use is currently illegal. But in several states and territories (South Australia, ACT and Northern Territory) a small amount for personal use is decriminalised. Arguments For And Against Legalizing Weed: The War on Drugs utilizes several techniques to achieve its goal of eliminating recreational drug use.

Arguments For And Against Legalizing Weed: The War on Drugs utilizes several techniques to achieve its goal of eliminating recreational drug use the legalization of marijuana fights different.

Arguments For And Against Legalizing Weed Counter Argument For Weed