Dove changes the concept of beauty

Women Photographers on Real Beauty. The new strategy led to all top 5 Campaigns of the Century, as rated by Advertising Age.

Dove changes the concept of beauty

She's nothing like the rest of us, Yes, diff'rent from the rest of us is Belle! She is an intelligent and undeniably beautiful young woman whose traits are looked down upon in her small French village. As a result of her status as an outcast, Belle yearns to break out of the small-minded community to experience a life of adventure.

Belle is also the fifth official member of the Disney Princess line-up. Contents Background Official Description Far-off places, daring sword fights, a prince in disguise, Belle longs for so much more than a "normal life" in this small, provincial town - a town where girls don't aspire to more than marrying well.

Still, adventure is the last thing on her mind when she rides her horse, Philippe, into the forest to find her beloved father, who is missing. Thinking only of her father, she makes a bargain with a Beast who holds her father captive in his castle.

Though the Beast now holds the key to Belle's prison, he doesn't have the key to her heart, and her yearning spirit won't be kept prisoner.

But after he risks his own life to save hers, she begins to see past his appearance. She realizes that deep inside him there might be something more than she - or he - has ever dreamed. Development When production first started on Beauty and the Beast, Belle's characterization was initially slightly closer to that of the original tale, being slightly timid yet also caring.

In the first draft, she also had to contend with two elder sisters who, similar to in the original tale, utterly hated her because she got more attention than them, especially regarding potential suitors.

In the second draft, she largely retained the traits from the first draft, although she also had a sister named Clarice whom, unlike her sisters in the first draft, genuinely cared for Belle's well being as well as a snobbish aunt named Marguerite who would have been the movie's equivalent of Belle's wicked sisters from the original tale and first draft.

However, after the storyboard reel was presented, then-Disney Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg ordered for it to be rewritten from scratch, both due to viewing it as too dark and dramatic, and because he envisioned a Broadway-like film with a "feminist twist" to the original tale.

To accomplish this, he hired Linda Woolvertonwho at the time had just started film screenwriting and her only other experience with Disney was writing some episodes of their various Saturday Morning cartoons. Woolverton based Belle on Katharine Hepburn's role of Jo March from the film adaptation of the book, "Little Women", and avoided using the Jean Cocteau film as a template for Belle and the film, even going as far as to avoid seeing the film.

She also gave Belle a love of literature to show her open-mindedness. She also made sure to make Belle a feminist in order to have her stand apart from Ariel in The Little Mermaidas she didn't want "another insipid princess", taking notes from the women's movement to create her character.

Paige O'Hara requested that Belle, similar to Jerry Orbach's handling of Lumiere in the same film, possess a French accent, although unlike Orbach, Disney refused the request.

Dove changes the concept of beauty

Personality Belle reading a book. Belle has gained a significant amount of intelligence over the years due to her love of books, which have provided her with an elevated vocabulary, an active imagination, and an open mind. She is very confident and outspoken in her opinions and seldom likes being told what to do.

Despite all this, she doesn't have very many friends. Her smarts and free-thinking attitude make her stand out from her fellow townspeople, who regard her as a little odd behind her beauty.

Unlike most characters in the film, Belle isn't concerned about her or others' appearances and is able to look past how people appear and see into their hearts.

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This is how Belle manages to break the Beast's curse and restore love and laughter to the castle. Belle is somewhat a free woman for her time and refuses to be mistreated, undermined, humiliated, demeaned, or controlled by anyone, especially and specifically Gaston in fact, he makes it quite clear that his ideal marriage with Belle includes her having "six or seven" good-looking sons with him, massaging his feet, cooking his dinner, scrubbing the floors, doing dirty work, and above all, no reading, as he considers intelligence in women to be ridiculous.

This is taken one step further in his song in the musical in which he sings that womankind "occasionally" serves a purpose in marriage, specifically "extending the family tree". However, Belle willingly listens to, takes advice from, and admires her father Maurice since, throughout most of her life, he's the only person who has believed in her unconditionally.

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She also considers the opinions and directions of the Beast, because, like Maurice, he is able to treat her as an equal the Beast eventually learned how throughout the course of the film. She also seemed to have a good relationship with the booksellerpresumably because of his encouraging her to pursue her love of literature.

Gaston, meanwhile, views Belle and all women of the village as ornamental only serving to make him look even better. She is quite resolute when it comes to stating and upholding her opinions and maintaining her ideas. Even though Belle says that she dreams of adventure, she also states that she wishes for a friend who accepts her for who she is.

This is because everyone in town criticizes her for doing her own thing and doesn't understand her, which makes her feel like she doesn't fit in. However, despite this, even when people gave her a hard time, she never changed, but came to a better understanding of herself.

This made the biggest difference when she broke the spell and charmed the Beast just by being herself.

Dove changes the concept of beauty

The Disney Comics New Adventures of Beauty and the Beast, set a few years before the events of the first film, imply that despite her love of fairy tales, Belle herself didn't believe in the supernatural, as when trying to explore a certain part of the Black Forest before encountering an owl, she mentioned in her thoughts she knew there weren't any mythical creatures in there.

Belle is quite witty and is able to use this trait to her advantage and outsmart people. When in an argument with the BeastBelle was able to hold her ground and challenge each of the Beast's points with a cunning comeback, such as "If you hadn't frightened me I wouldn't have run away" or "You should learn to control your temper".

Each of these statements left the Beast stunned and at a loss for words. Belle managed to think of these comebacks without much thought or hesitation. Belle's logic may also have helped her save Maurice by realizing that something was going on in the castle that she wanted to find out.

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Soon, in the West Wing, she is almost able to discover the true identity of the Beast, though she briefly forgets it in the end.Princess Aurora (also known as Briar Rose) is the protagonist of Disney's animated feature film, Sleeping Beauty.

She is the daughter of King Stefan and Queen Leah. On the day of her christening, Aurora was cursed to die by the evil fairy Maleficent. Due to the efforts of three good. Aug 20,  · Dove bonds the emotion between Dove and consumer by Dove Campaign Idea about The Real Beauty.

In a world of hype and stereotypes, Dove provides a refreshingly real alternative for women who recognise that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. The Dove Global Beauty and Confidence Report found that 7 in 10 (69%) women and 6 in 10 (65%) girls believe the media and advertising set an unrealistic standard of beauty that most women can’t ever achieve.

At Dove, we have a vision of a world where beauty is a source of confidence, not anxiety. Our mission is to ensure the next generation grow up enjoying a positive relationship with the way they look – helping girls to raise their self-esteem and realise their full potential.

I'm a Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore colour expert. Online, virtual decorating and e-design consultations. Affordable and creative ideas that suit you AND your home! Dove launched the “Campaign for Real Beauty” in , in response to the findings of a major global study, The Real Truth About Beauty: A Global Report, w hich had revealed that only 2% of women around the world would describe themselves as beautiful (Etcoff, Orbach, Scott, & D’Agostino, ).

The main message of the Dove campaign was.

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